NSF/DFG Collaboration to Understand the Prime Factors Driving Distortion in Milled Aluminum Workpieces

NSF/DFG Collaboration to Understand the Prime Factors Driving Distortion in Milled Aluminum Workpieces

PhD students Destiny Garcia, Renan Ribero, Christopher D’Elia

Assist. Prof. Barbara Linke, Professor Michael Hill

Distortion in manufacturing is a defined as the deviation of a part shape from original intent after released from the fixture. In machining, there are two main causes of part distortion:

  1. Machining induced distortion driven into the workpiece from a cutting tool
  2. Bulk residual stress induced distortion in which there is a rebalance of residual stress from re-equilibration due to material removal.

Figure 1 Assumed machining distortion mechanism

This research tests the hypothesis that distortion of thin walled monolithic workpieces during milling can be predicted and controlled from understanding bulk residual stresses and machining residual stresses. We study bulk residual stresses, machining residual stresses, and their superposition through well defined experimental and modeling work at UC Davis and at TU Kaiserslautern at Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jan C. Aurich’s Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Production Systems (FBK).

This project is funded by the National Science Foundation under Award No. 1663341 (Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, Manufacturing Machines and Equipment  (MME)).

Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

The TU Kaiserslautern project is funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

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